Ten Quote Tuesday (#22)

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Welcome to another installment of Ten Quote Tuesday! If your creative juices have trouble flowing today, then read these quotes and writing prompts to nudge awake the sleeping muse. If there is a particular quote you enjoyed, let us all know with your comments below.

Check out last week’s episode here.

 

Quotes

“Get into the scene late; get out of the scene early.” -David Mamet

“Torture yourself about your failures. And then get back to work.” -Tony Kushner

“If you get the landscape right, the characters will step out of it, and they’ll be in the right place.” -Annie Proulx

“The great wisdom for writers, perhaps for everybody, is to come to understand to be at one with their own tempo.” -Alan Hollinghurst

“So the writer who breeds more words than he needs, is making a chore for the reader who reads.” -Theodore Geisel, “Dr. Seuss”

“Dreaming in public is an important part of our job description.” -William Gibson

“Write books only if you say in them things you would not dare confide to anyone.” -E.M. Cioran

“An artist’s only concern is to shoot for some kind of perfection, and on his own terms, not anyone else’s.” -J.D. Salinger

“When I first wanted to be a writer, I learned to write prose by reading poetry.” -Nicholson Baker

“A short story must have a single mood, and every sentence must build toward it.” -Edgar Allan Poe

 

Writing Prompts

  •  Include all these elements into a scene: green water, a briefcase, a thrill, and jumping.
  • Start your scene with this line: This town needed a good cleaning.
  • Have a scene with an unorganized interior decorator.

 

Be sure to stop by the Writer’s Toolbox for free, useful tools that no author should go without. If you enjoyed this post, consider subscribing via email to have future ones delivered to you. Image courtesy of Nicolas Raymond via Flickr, Creative Commons.

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27 thoughts on “Ten Quote Tuesday (#22)”

  1. “The great wisdom for writers, perhaps for everybody, is to come to understand to be at one with their own tempo.” -Alan Hollinghurst

    That’s such great advice for every part of your life in general. Some of us spend our whole lives trying to FIND that tempo.

    Like

  2. Hello, my name is Gregory Thomas. I’m a writer and poet, and I also write stories. 🙂 Actually, I think you read and liked some of my work on my blog, I wanted to thank you very much for your support.

    Sincerely,

    your friend, Gregory Thomas

    Like

  3. “Dreaming in public is an important part of our job description.”
    & the truth has been spoken, people.

    I’m not a professional writer as of yet but damn do I daydream a lot; in the street, in class, at home… I even catch myself saying a sentence out loud sometimes (generally part of the dialogue) just to taste the feel of it. Admittedly, that only happens when I’m alone but I don’t feel too silly about it. I don’t believe I’m the only one who says out of the blue “Attack me again and I’ll kill you. Follow me and I’ll kill you…” while doing the dishes hhhh

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I came by to say thank you for reading my work. I stayed a while and really enjoyed 10 “Tuesday. I’m a Gibson fan of the special liked your inclusion of his words. As you know don’t know it is impossible to follow all the people who I am interested in enough to follow. My inbox is clogged already and yet I can’t resist following your blog even though I may not get to read every edition.
    Thanks again for your time and attention,
    Alexander

    Like

  5. I love the Proulx quote, if only because it captures that wonderfully grand, austere and cynical approach to making stories that has produced so much great work. Thanks for this great article!

    Like

  6. “An artist’s only concern is to shoot for some kind of perfection, and on his own terms, not anyone else’s.” -J.D. Salinger

    I guess that’s why we re-write so many times!

    Like

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