Ten Quote Tuesday (#46)

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Welcome to another installment of Ten Quote Tuesday! If your creative juices have trouble flowing today, then read these quotes to nudge awake the sleeping muse.

If there is a particular quote you enjoyed, let us all know with your comments below.

Check out last week’s episode here.

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The Raven Boys – Book Review

Check out the newest book review from the Book Review Directory.

The Book Review Directory

The Raven Boys

Title: The Raven Boys

Author: Maggie Stiefvater

Publisher: Scholastic Press

Published on: September 2013

Genre: Urban Fantasy, Paranormal, Young-Adult Fiction

Synopsis (via Goodreads):

“There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

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Top 10 Things You Need to Consider If You Want to Write Comedy

Comedy

 

I’ve been asked numerous times (less than 3) on how do I get in the mood to write comedy. Only on rare occasions (more than 390 times a year) do these answers haunt the back of my mind.  This is not a winning formula or a how to episode, but more along the lines of ten things we must do in order to write comedy.

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Make Your Readers Cry: Writing Emotional Scenes

Crying

 

by Allison Maruska

I watched The Hunger Games last night. I read the book before the movie came out, and I’ve seen the movie a few times. So I obviously knew what would happen. Still, a certain scene got me.

By that, I mean it made me weepy.

I’m not usually a weepy individual, so the moment surprised me. I think the root of it was I forgot this particular scene was in the movie (I don’t think it was in the book). I’d also had a couple glasses of wine. Bad memory + alcohol = the feels (that’s not one of the tips, but maybe write it down anyway).

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Write Everyday, Even If You Hate It

Pen

 

For the last three weeks, I was forced to write everyday in order to complete a presentation for an English symposium and to complete my creative writing portfolio for a public reading (each are requirements of my major and emphasis). The problem initially was my lack of enthusiasm. I have, in the past, written not based on routine or discipline, but because I like writing and I enjoy it immensely.

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Top 10 Posts of the Spring!

Field

 

Happy Summer Everyone! Today is the official first day of summer, even though many of us have felt it before now. As we all dust off our beach towels and sunscreen, I thought it would be fun to have a top 5 list of the articles on this blog. The criteria is based on page views by you all, fair reader.

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How to Tell Which Self-Publishing Company is Right For You

Business

 

The following is an update of a post I wrote for Joel Friedlander’s ever-helpful blog at TheBookDesigner.com.

On the path to self-publishing, your first decision will be whether to:

  • Engage a self-publishing service company (SPSC) to do everything from editing to distribution. Some SPSCs are BookLocker, Mill City Press, Outskirts Press, and Dog Ear Press.
  • Do it yourself (DIY) by hiring editors, designers, and other freelancers and uploading your finished, formatted cover and manuscript to POD providers such as CreateSpace and IngramSpark and ebook distributors such as KDP and Smashwords.

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Get Rid of Repetition: Pleonasms in Your Writing

Demons

 

Did you know that when you use more words than necessary to express something (like blowing wind or frozen ice), you are committing a pleonasm, which is the fancy Greek way of saying you’re being redundant? Redundancy in writing sounds like a simple thing to spot—and sometimes it is. But some types of redundancy can be tricky to identify, and that’s because we tend to speak in expressions in English, so redundant phrases become little package deals, like a true fact or a free gift. (I hate to break it to you, but if it’s not free, you’re doing gifts wrong.)

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