How to Write a Novel That Will Actually Be Worthy of Publishing

Typing

 

by Michael Cristiano

So, you say you have a dream, Mr. Martin Luther King Jr. of prospective fiction (or nonfiction) writer. Well, so do I, and so do millions of others around the world. That is to write a book, but not just any damn book: a book that will be good enough to publish.

Seems like a pretty simple goal, right? In today’s day and age, there are a billion ways to see your work published: paperback, hardcover, ebook, literary magazine, traditional publishing, self-publishing, hybrid publishing, serialization, writing your novel on your arm and reciting it in the subway (okay, maybe not that one…)

Since publishing a book is easier and more accessible than ever before, it’s important to know how to write a novel that’s worthy of being published.

 

Read Widely
“This is a given,” you say. This is what got you into wanting to write the most epic, mind-shattering, life-changing fiction in the world in the first place. It’s amazing though how quickly reading gets shut out of life after a 9-to-5 job, commuting, cooking, cleaning, sleeping, and meeting word counts consumes all your time.

Trust me, I’m guilty of putting reading at the bottom of my priority list. I find it hard to find time to read, but it really is necessary for a successful writing career. Reading allows writers to become fluent in their craft. It allows us to see what works for other authors, and what could work for us. It allows us to stay on top of what’s happening in the publishing industry and to analyze those happenings and apply them to our own career.

And you MUST read widely. Don’t only read the genre you write. It’s tempting to say, “Oh, well, I only write fantasy, so I’ll read myself silly with George R. R. Martin and J. R. R. Tolkien and Terry Pratchett”. Read everything. Read contemporary and young adult and romance and how-to manuals about square dancing and cat-sitting.

The classics are also a must—and believe me when I say that you won’t detest them as much as you did when you were forced to enjoy them in high school.

 

Learn How to Write & Edit Like Mad
Writing without knowing anything about the craft is like scuba diving without an air tank. It’s like running a marathon without proper shoes. It’s like driving a car with your eyes closed (which I do not recommend, to be clear).

You need to invest something into your writing, and I don’t mean that you have to toil and toil over plot points and character development and 100,000 cat videos on YouTube (though, that’s all included). You’re going to need to get control of your grammar and the conventions of your genre. You should invest in a style guide and maybe even read a few how-to‘s and don’t-do‘s. There are millions of resources online and at your local bookstore, and if you’re interested in improving your craft, I’ve already written a post with tips.

Even when you’ve mastered all those semi-colons and romance novel tropes and Oxford commas, you must still edit. All manuscripts go through a revision process, sometimes upwards of ten times, and if self-publishing is the right route for you, it is ESSENTIAL that you hire a professional editor to prepare your work for publication. There’s nothing more terrible than a novel that has grammar, spelling, and plotting issues (except maybe driving with your eyes closed).

 

Don’t Follow Trends
Are vampires and zombies cool anymore? No, it’s dystopian fiction and Fifty Shades of Too-Embarrassed-to-Be-Caught-Reading? Well, then.

Following trends doesn’t work. By the time you write something that follows a trend, polish it, and publish it, chances are that trend will be on the way out or already gone. Besides, it’s even worse when a writer writes something in order to try to capitalize on the bee’s-knees-du-jour, and it’s so blatantly obvious that they did that they write garbage. These novels lack originality and personality.

So, screw the trends. Write something that feels right for you, and maybe you’ll grandfather (or grandmother) your own trend. Talk about mind-shattering!

 

Know When It’s Crap
Ah, my USB. It’s a place where all the magic happens—and also the place where manuscripts go to DIE! Truth be told, not all of your work is meant to be published. Sometimes we write something full of clichés and plot holes and enough literary conventions to make Shakespeare hiss in territorial protection.

And that’s okay! You’re allowed to write crappy every once in a while. I did it. I have a manuscript that’s been edited multiple times but is now enjoying retirement in my “Nice Try” folder. I even have a nice disclaimer on the front page that says “In the event of my death, DO NOT publish posthumously”. It’s that crappy.

 

How do you know when it’s time to let go?

  • You’ve Lost Interest. That initial spark is gone, and writing the piece feels like drinking three-week-old urine with ground up ceramic. Yeah, that feeling.
  • You’ve Written Yourself into a Hole. This is the hardest time to let go. This happens when your plot is so mangled that it’s unrecognizable. It’s unfocused and messy, inconsistent and terrible. Sure, you could edit, but is it worth it? Maybe let it be for a while and come back later.
  • You’re Not Ready. We all need the opportunity to fail. Sometimes what you write is just the trial edition. You can’t run a marathon without training. You need some practice runs, so to speak. It’s important to know when you’re writing a practice run, especially if you’re just starting out and writing your first novel.

How do you know when something you’ve written is worthy of publication? Do we ever really know?

 

 

Guest post contributed by Michael Cristiano. He works in editing and acquisitions for Curiosity Quills Press, and his freelance work has appeared on websites such as Nexopia, FluentU, and BlushPost. Check out his blog for more of his work.

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22 thoughts on “How to Write a Novel That Will Actually Be Worthy of Publishing”

  1. Great post, I agree it’s freeing to write but I don’t follow a trend and I read everything but scary nightmare inducing literature. I guess I’m doing alright in that department. Now to take more time to finish my manuscript when my family still has to be fed, clothed, and loved. Oh well I always have been a work in progress I might as well write a book in progress. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “Read Widely” – Best advice I got from Stephen King’s “On Writing.” He talks about how part of his job as an author is to spend hours a day reading.

    Still working on mastering that whole, “Know when to let it go” thing… Gotta remember that I’m going to keep writing- There will be more stories. Let the bad ones go.

    Thanks for the great insights!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great article. Finding the time to read, and read widely, is a particular challenge of mine also!

    Getting none friends and family feedback is key also, in my opinion. They obviously don’t want to hurt you feelings and perhaps aren’t as critical as good beta readers are.

    This is a great blog by the way, really happy to be following.

    Like

  4. Whenever I read posts of this nature, I always nod and say, “Yep. The truth be told…” No matter how long and hard I work at the craft, writing never becomes easier. Despite my best efforts, I’m always in doubt.

    Thanks, Michael and Ryan. I appreciate the common thread.

    Like

  5. I especially like the point about reading widely. I’ve branched out recently and am learning a lot about what works for me in others’ writing, across multiple genres, some of which I didn’t realize I would actually enjoy. Now if I can just recognize the wrong turns when I make them myself! Always easier to see problems in someone else’s stuff. 🙂
    The worst thing is for the book in which you dug yourself into a hole to get published and attract bad reviews like lettuce attracts snails. I know.

    Liked by 1 person

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