How to Get Your Novel Made into a Film

Hollywood

 

by Gary Smailes

In this article you will discover the steps a novel must go through in order to be made into a film; you’ll gain a deeper understanding of the process and discover the elements that you, as an author, can control to have a positive impact on the chances of seeing your book on the big screen.

This article will focus on the period of time before filming begins, since this is when an author has the most impact on the project. Once the cameras start rolling, the author’s role lessens greatly.

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What to Do While Waiting to Revise

Clock

 

by Millie Ho

I didn’t do enough of waiting before revising in the past. Because I didn’t wait, I wasn’t entirely removed from the narrative. Characters and situations were still fresh in my mind, and my revisions suffered because I still had vivid and biased opinions about what’s what. The only way I can edit Draft One objectively is to put some time between me and the manuscript, so that’s what I’ve been doing for the past few weeks: waiting.

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Why I Write Science Fiction & Fantasy

Treehouse

 

by Kate M. Colby

If you follow me on social media, you may have seen this month’s exciting announcement: for the second semester, The Cogsmith’s Daughter (Desertera #1) will be taught in a university classroom.

This time, TCD features in a Science Fiction & Fantasy literature class. When I saw the syllabus, I nearly cried. To have my book read alongside such legends is an incredible honor—and one I do not take lightly.

In fact, it got me thinking…what is it about Science Fiction and Fantasy novels (and TV shows, movies, video games, etc.) that I love so much?

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I Deal with Imposter Syndrome Daily and I Haven’t Quit Writing Yet

Imposter

 

by Meg Dowell

Writing is hard enough. Add imposter syndrome into the mix and it becomes the kind of challenge you have to remind yourself, quite often, is still worth pursuing.

Imposter syndrome is more of psychological phenomenon than an actual syndrome. It is nothing more than a bundle of feelings of inadequacy. But it isn’t just raw self-doubt: these feelings persist even when there’s clear evidence that a person who does not believe they are actually good at what they do is, in fact, very good at what they do.

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7 Tips for Paranormal Writers

Eye

 

by Jacqui Murray

One of my writing gigs is as an Amazon Vine Voice. They send me free books (and other products) and I share my honest opinion. If you go to Amazon, you’ll find a label (Vine Voice) by my name, as you will with all of the other Vine reviewers. It just means we accept the responsibility to share our thoughts as objectively as possible.

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Mercer Street – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

Mercer Street

Source: I received a free e-copy in exchange for an honest review.
Genre: Fiction, Historical Fiction, Time Travel
Format: eBook
Publication Date: October 21, 2015

Summary

In the wake of a tragedy caused by her husband’s affair, the newly widowed Susan, Amanda, her daughter, and Elizabeth, Susan’s mother, head to California for a little R&R. When Elizabeth hears of a lecture in which Professor Bell is presenting his theories on time travel, she persuades her daughter and granddaughter to attend with her. After the lecture, Amanda and Susan are not convinced that time travel is a reality; however, Elizabeth manages to convince them to speak to Professor Bell after the lecture.

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What Previously Published Means for Flash Fiction

Safe

 

by  Christina Dalcher

[Alternately titled: Previously published (or, don’t be as stupid as I was) ]

Today’s blog post is brought to you by the Letter S for Stupid and the Number 1 for All it takes is one website to lock you out.

Confused? I’ll explain.

You already know I write flash fiction. Some of it’s decent; some of it gets picked up by nice editors. I pen stuff, I submit it, and the nice editors look it over as long as I follow their submission guidelines.

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