Book Quote Corner #60

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5 Great Creative Writing Tips (Which I Never Follow)

 

by Daniella Levy

I am very much a self-taught writer. I had to be; my formal English language education more or less ended in fourth grade when I immigrated to Israel. I learned mostly from reading, writing, and getting feedback from my friends. The only writing book I read during my adolescence was Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.

In recent years, however, I decided to see what I could learn from outside resources. So I took a few online creative writing classes through FutureLearn and Coursera, and read Anne Lammott’s Bird by Bird and Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way. I started reading essays passed around on social media about writing, and watched TED talks about writing and creativity, etc. etc. etc.

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“Screen Fatigue” Sees UK eBook Sales Plunge 17% as Readers Return to Print

by Mark Sweney at the Guardian

Consumer sales down to £204m last year and are at lowest level since 2011 – when Amazon Kindle sales first took off in UK

Britons are abandoning the ebook at an alarming rate with sales of consumer titles down almost a fifth last year, as “screen fatigue” helped fuel a five-year high in printed book sales.

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Lessons Learned from Finishing A Book

 

 

by Destine Williams

Hey everybody! It’s Meditative Monday which means that it’s time for tea, coffee, thoughts, and me sounding more like a fortune cookie than usual.

Over the weekend, I had time to celebrate with friends and family, but also I’ve had time to reflect on becoming an author and now I think I can actually translate the feelings into some valuable things that I learned on writing.

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Ancillary Justice – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

Ancillary Justice by Anne Leckie

This book one of a three part series. Read this book first, then the next two, for Ancillary Justice sets up the other two. The world created by Ann Leckie is not one that will be familiar to most readers, even those who read primarily science fiction. Part of it is Leckie’s writing style that to this reader seemed a lot like Ayn Rand. It is terse prose that admits little feeling even though there is a lot of emotion under the surface. I felt detached from the narrative the entire time, though it is well-plotted and the characters, some human, some machine or robotic-like, some a mix are complex.

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Writing Past a Problem

 

by Lev Raphael

Working on my most recently published book, I ran into a significant problem.  To move the novel forward, I needed my protagonist to have a confrontation with a minor character.  I knew what this woman’s role was in the book and how she drove the plot forward.

But the woman herself was a blank.  I had no idea what she looked like, what she sounded like, what kind of house she had.  None of that was real.  And so I did when I’ve learned to do after many years as an author: I let go.  Consciously, that is.

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WorldBuilding: New World Essentials

 

by Whitney Carter

Over the past few weeks I’ve been working on creating a master worldbuilding worksheet. It’s taken so long because the list is so extensive – I hope to have it ready for both you and me in the coming weeks, but it occurred to me this morning as I began worldbuilding for a new story that an abbreviated checklist might be useful. It’s so easy to get overwhelmed when you sit down to write and realize you have to build a world from the ground up.

Where do you start? How detailed do you need to be? Where should you focus your attention initially? Are you writing a story or an encyclopedia?

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Putting the “Professional” in Professional Writer

 

 

by Kelsie Engen

Do you plan your WIPs out? I don’t mean “do you outline” or know what you’re writing tomorrow. I mean, do you know your schedule for the next two years?

Yep. I said years.

I’m trying something a little different this year. I’ve been a “writer” for many years now, and I’ve always just written what I feel like writing when I feel like doing it (and for clarity’s sake, I’m including editing, revising, outlining, etc. in that word “writing”). And in following that process, I’ve written half a dozen novels, and polished one novel and three short stories.

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