Three Ways Canva Can Help with Your Writing Business

by Kay Vandette

You don’t have to be a graphic design artist to take advantage of the online program Canva.

Even if you don’t have a drop of artistic talent, if you’re a freelance writer trying to do any sort of blogging or building a social media platform, Canva is your secret weapon with hundreds of resources waiting for you take advantage of them.

What started as the brain child of Melanie Perkins, a graphic design teacher who sought to streamline basic graphic design, has become a hugely successful online tool. Used by both professionals and amateurs, Canva’s easy to use interface makes graphic design accessible for everyone.

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How to Work With Beta Readers

 

by Hope Ann

There is no one secret to producing a good book. Hard work, patience, more hard work, dogged determination, and did I mention hard work? Yet it is so worth it. And, the more I write, the more I value one particular asset every writer should have.

Beta readers!

Beta readers are wonderful. Sometimes they are friends. Sometimes they are other writers. Sometimes they are people you’ve never met before but who have signed up to help you. Whatever the case, they provide an excellent new look at your own work, commenting on points you’ve missed because of your closeness to your story. If there are problems you are trying to ignore, they will be quick to point those out too.

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Here’s the Reality Check For Writers

 

by Doug Lewars

According to Forbes there are between 600 thousand and a million books published each year and roughly half are self-published. The average number of sales per volume is less than 250.

That’s not encouraging.

Of course I have no idea where Forbes came up with these numbers. Still, they tend to be pretty careful about what they publish so let’s assume the numbers are real. Now, if you are capable of writing, editing and publishing say, two books per year, and if you want to earn a conservative income of say, $30,000, then you would need royalties of $60 per volume. Given that publishers rather like taking their cut, your book would probably need to be priced around a hundred dollars. Better make that next book non-fiction.

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3 Tips From My Failure As an Author

 

by Kelsie Engen

You’re standing on one mountain summit, and there are fifty miles between the next mountaintop to which you’re expected to jump. Any step you take, any direction, and you’re going to go crashing to the ground, lucky to escape with your life. There will be bruises, broken bones, broken pride, despair, and maybe, if you’re lucky, a little bit of determination that you can dig out of the rubble, dust off, and put back in place.

That is being a writer. Oh, and add a small audience watching you fail, because even beginning writers tend to have a small, critical audience watching.

Congratulations, you just failed.

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Creating that “Killer” Character

 

by Georgio Konstandi

“I shall not exist if you do not imagine me.”   – Vlamidir Nabokov, Novelist/Poet (1899-1977)

From Blanche Dubois to Ebenezer Scrooge, literature has never failed to produce characters that resonate with millions of readers from across the globe. But where did they come from? What ignited the first wisps of smoke of these authors’ imaginative infernos? How do we, as modern-day writers, emulate such success when we sit down, a blank screen before our eyes, fingers at our keyboards?

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The First Rule for Writing a Modern Novel

 

by Lynne Stringer

You may not know it but there are rules for writing a modern novel. Now, every good rule needs to be broken at some point but is it a good idea to say that all rules should be ignored because writing is a creative exercise?

I don’t think so but I think there are times and places for them and so I’m going to tackle each one in turn. Here’s the first:

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6 Ways Tabletop Gaming Can Help Improve Your Writing

 

by Whitney Carter

It’s no secret that I’m a pretty big fan of Pathfinder. I’ve been on both sides of the table, and enjoyed some really well thought out adventure paths and one-shots from a number of different perspectives. Regardless of the story progression or where my character stands though, almost every session shares one commonality: I walk away buzzing with creative energy.

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5 tips for New Writers

 

by S. T. Sanchez

  1. Don’t be afraid to re-write

Writing isn’t always the simplest to do.  Inspiration doesn’t always strike at the right time.  Whether you are a few chapters in or almost finished, if you need to rewrite go back and do it!  You want your novel to be perfect.  If you need to fix something, no matter how much work it is going to take, DO IT!  Your book will be better because of it.

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Bizarre Things People Say to Authors

 

by Lev Raphael

Nobody tells you that when you publish a book, it becomes a license for total strangers to say outrageous things to you that you could never imagine saying to anyone.

I’m not just talking about people who’ve actually bought your book. Even people who haven’t read your book feel encouraged to share, in the spirit of helpfulness.

At first, when you’re on tour, it’s surprising, then tiring — but eventually it’s funny, and sometimes it even gives you material for your next book. All the comments on this list have been offered to me or other writer friends in almost exactly these words:

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