Editorial Review – Walking Through Fire

The Book Review Directory

Title: Walking Through Fire

Author: C. J. Bahr

Genre: Romance, Fantasy/Paranormal

The first in a paranormal romance series, Walking Through Fire sets a tone for adventure, mishap, and spicy romance. This book covers Laurel Saville’s story as she visits northern Scotland on the heels of a messy breakup. Her best friend, Beth, has a bed-and-breakfast there which she shares with her husband, Grant, but Laurel’s never had a chance to visit until now.

But her arrival is a bit untimely. She’s come during the Primrose Festival, which is when Simon MacKay’s ghost supposedly returns to her very room. Some say he comes looking for Jacobite gold, the very gold he’d killed his father over, while others claim he doesn’t exist.

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What Does Your Character Depend On?

 

by Hope Ann

There are three main questions, powerful, yet short, which an author should ask and answer for each of their characters. The first question is, what does your character want? What does he desire more than anything? What will he give anything for and what is he striving for? Coupled with this question (if the character is a major one) is what does he really need, and is it what he wants?

Secondly, what does your character fear? What will he do almost anything to avoid? Is what he wants more powerful than what he fears or vice versa?

Continue reading What Does Your Character Depend On?

Editorial Review – Executable File

The Book Review Directory

Title: Executable File

Author: Dave Cohen

Genre: Techno Thriller

This novel covers the rather uncertain career of Dan File, a superhacker who was so bored in college that he began tweaking his football-playing roommate’s grades for the fun of it.

After that escapade, he began downloading the oppositions’ playbooks and sharing them with his school’s team.

His electronic antics went unnoticed for some time, but at last, the discrepancies became apparent. Dan was too smart to leave any evidence behind, but his college scholarship was revoked all the same and he was asked to leave the school.

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How Some Writing Advice Can Actually Hurt You

 

by Chloe-Anne Ross

What Should I Write About?

Whenever I’m listening to another writer’s Q&A on writing, this question seems to pop-up every now and again. I never understood why it would be asked or what kind of answer was expected until I got stuck.

I would love to be a writer and I would love to be published so it’s important to me that I remember it’s not an impossible dream by listening to those who have done it. So I listen to their advice, I learn that I should know my target audience and my genre and if I want to be a writer I need to engage with writing communities and get my name out there. 

Continue reading How Some Writing Advice Can Actually Hurt You

Free Manuscript Critique Comes to AWP Writers Club

Hi all!

To let everyone know, free partial manuscript critique is now a benefit of A Writer’s Path Writers Club. Here is the page for the free services, accessed only by active members:

https://ryanlanz.com/writers-club-free-services/

(password protected)

We’re adding new free services all the time. In fact, I just added free query editing, free proposal editing, and free manuscript editing today.

If you’re not a current member, check out our club!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brake Failure – Book Review

All Romance Reads

brake failure

Title: Brake Failure
Author:  Alison Brodie
Genres: Romance, Contemporary
Publisher: Clip Board Press
Published: January 9, 2017
Pages: 323
Format: ebook
Source: Author
I have not laughed this much while reading a novel in a while. You know the kind that makes you feel you are about to pee yourself?  Oh my, Brake Failure by Alison Brodie had me in a laughing frenzy, and by the end, I was all smiles.

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Should Your Story Use Prophecy?

 

by Stephanie O’Brien

In some stories, the plot’s resolution takes everyone by surprise. Nobody knew how the story would end, or how the outcome would be achieved. In others, the ending was a surprise to absolutely no one, because a prophecy had already spoiled the ending long before it could happen.

 

The downside to having a prophecy:

Having a prophecy about your plot or protagonist has one obvious drawback: it spoils the ending of the story, and removes much of the dramatic tension that you otherwise could have built.

Continue reading Should Your Story Use Prophecy?