Editorial Review – Ollie Ollie in Come Free

The Book Review Directory

Book Title: Ollie OllieIn Come Free

Author: Anne Bernard Becker

Genre: Memoir

Ollie OllieIn Come Free is the product of an author’s lifelong struggle to deal with and process the traumatic events of her childhood, and to analyze the repercussions that it inevitably had on her as an adult. This memoir is a moving, emotional, and intimately personal tale of a family who had experienced more than its fair share of death. Specifically, it relates what it was like for Anne to grow up amidst the grief and turmoil, with the ever-present background of a rapidly changing and progressing world.

Straight out of the gate, the readers will know that Anne is not coping very well as an adult. She struggles in her role as a wife and as a mother as a result of never having dealt with the pain of losing first her…

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Who Else: Writing Secondary and Minor Characters

 

by Morgan S. Hazelwood

 

Who Else Is There?

Writers know all about our main character–they’re the focus of our story. Often, the story is told in their voice.

But what about everyone else? Unless you’re writing a person-versus-nature like Hatchet, you’re probably going to have other characters.

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Walmart Makes a Late Entry Into the E-Book Market

 

by Michael Corkery at The New York Times

 

Walmart is making a circuitous and belated push into the digital book market, teaming up with a Japanese company to sell e-books and audiobooks.

The deal with Rakuten, an e-commerce giant based in Japan, will allow Walmart to start selling digital books on its website for the first time later this year.

The move, which was announced late Thursday, comes years after Walmart’s archrival, Amazon, began to dominate the market for digital readers.

Walmart customers will be able to read the books through Rakuten Kobo e-reading devices — which have not taken hold with Americans the way Amazon’s Kindle and Barnes & Noble’s Nook have.

The partnership is part of Walmart’s effort to ensure that its online offerings include every conceivable product line, giving shoppers no reason to click over to Amazon.

 

Read the rest of the article at the New York Times.

 

 

 

 

Editorial Review – Death Before Dishonor

The Book Review Directory

Title: Death Before Dishonor

Author: Kenny Hyman

Genre: Espionage Action/Suspense

This novel tells the story of Terry and Yuri Ciccone—brothers and partners in their craft of killing silently, without presence and without trace—as they go from youth to manhood and discover the costs of learning to fight.

Yuri is white while Terry is black, adopted by Italian-American parents who later become pregnant and have Yuri. They love both their children deeply, but when Terry starts getting bullied at his Japanese school, they decide he needs to learn to defend himself.

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How to Not be a “Starving Writer”

 

by Sheree Crawford

Writing can pay.

No seriously. Ok, so the average author earns less than the Living Wage (hell, they sometimes earn less than the Minimum Wage), but the great thing about writing is that it’s a versatile skill that can be applied to so many situations. A few conversations with followers about just how hard it can be to make money as a writer spurred this article; these are 5 ways to make money as a writer that are open to everyone.

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Editorial Review – Sieging Manganela

The Book Review Directory

Title: Sieging Manganela

Author: Charon Dunn

Genre: YA Science Fiction

Sieging Manganela is a prequel in terms of chronology, but it can easily be read by itself. Featuring a few of the main characters from One Sunny Night and Retrograde Horizon, it primarily centers on the unlikely friendship between Turo, a soldier in the Vanram army, and Zeffany, a tech specialist who lives inside the city that’s under siege.

They’re supposed to be enemies, but he helps her get an injured friend out of danger and away from the war. Still, he’s loyal to his side. He reports back on what happened and helps lay a trap for anyone else who might come out of the city—and then attacks one of Zeffany’s fellow citizens when he was all-too-ready to press unwanted attentions on her.

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