How to Write an Ending That Fits Your Story

 

by Andrea Lundgren

 

Personally, I like fitting endings even more than happy ones. Sure, it’s nice to know that the characters you’ve read about succeed. When you’ve invested time and emotional energy, you enjoy it when they make it out of their troubles and gain the victory they’ve sought for so long, but I don’t like false endings. I don’t like endings that feel fake, as though the author pulled some strings with the fictional higher powers to give the characters the ending they wanted, rather than what they deserved.

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Two More Days For the Writing Contest!

 

Hi all!

There’s only two more days (almost one day now) left to participate in the current creative writing contest.

I know there are many of you finishing up your story to submit tomorrow. Even if it’s not perfect, I encourage you to submit. You can’t win if you don’t enter.

Keep in mind that the prizes total $250 in cash and over $3,200 in prizes. Check the link here for more information:

https://ryanlanz.com/2018/02/01/short-story-writing-contest/

Good luck everyone!

 

 

 

 

How to Balance Quality with Quantity to Write More, Better

 

by Meg Dowell

 

Writing a lot and writing well at the same time? It’s not easy, but it’s possible.

I know of writers and overall content creators who publish a new piece of content every day — and their work is usually good. But not always great.

I also know of creators who publish new content less frequently — and it’s always phenomenal.

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Finding Your (Literary) Voice

 

by Michael Mohr

 

Finding your literary “voice” in writing is tough, no question. So much of it is organic, visceral, from within. What does that mean? Well, basically it means that you’re not likely to “find your voice” from an MFA class or from a writing seminar or from a writing conference or from a book focusing on voice. All the above mentioned certainly can help. But to truly find your voice, if “find” is really the most accurate word (I’d say “discover”), it’s really more about your confidence, your life experience, and your sense of self as it relates to the world.

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What Fiction Classifications Can Tell You About Your Readers

 

by Andrea Lundgren

 

You can’t always tell who’s going to pick up your story and read it. Sometimes, readers are unpredictable. Those who don’t read your genre may stumble upon it and read it anyways, and what speaks to one person won’t to another.

But you can tell some things about your own story based on the fiction classification. This isn’t a genre-thing, but more a flavor of the story based on character, plot, and description, and it can tell you something about why someone would pick up your story. Not all readers read for the same reason, and sometimes, a reader who generally favors one kind of fiction may want another kind as a change of pace.

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How to Defeat Your Writer’s Block

 

by Ryan Lanz

 

For some, writer’s block is a very real and forbidding thing. I personally know authors who treat this as a superstition that no amount of garlic and rabbit feet will save them from.

There are countless blog posts on how to beat writer’s block–and yes, we’ll go over that too–although I want to also look at why a writer might encounter a writing block. Perhaps it’s not for the reasons you think, and it could be indicative of deeper issues. Let’s begin.

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How People Judge a Book By Its Cover

 

by Richard Risemberg

 

If your work is to be produced by a trade publisher, the cover will be entirely out of your hands. This can be a good thing, and it can be a bad thing: good, because it is by no means easy to design and produce a good cover; bad, because you may get stuck with a bad one. In A Moveable Feast, Ernest Hemingway notes how he felt that the original cover to Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby was awful, looking like something designed for a cheap sci-fi potboiler–and later mentions Scott’s complaints that the book wasn’t selling well. Fitzgerald was a popular and successful author at the time.

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How to Write Children’s Picture Books: Enrich Your Story With Dialogue

 

by Yvonne Blackwood

 

Your Ronnie Rabbit story is progressing nicely and you are loving his intricate moves. Then halfway into the tale, it dawns on you that the story cannot be all narration. There must be interactions between Ronnie and other animals—family members, friends, even enemies. The missing link is dialogue. Your anthropomorphic rabbit, behaving like a human being, must speak to someone at sometime in order to make some scenes come alive.

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Real Writers Persist. Always.

 

by Lauren Sapala

 

When writers first start out writing they tend to concentrate on all the wrong things. The big question always seems to be: Do I have talent? This is followed closely by: How do I get an agent? When I was a new writer I also agonized quite a bit over these things. It’s very normal. Whenever a person begins to truly take risks and follow their passion, the first challenges to surface are always questions of self worth and approval from others.

And make no mistake, that IS what the talent and agent questions are really all about: self worth and approval. Every human being goes through it in one form or another. For writers, anxiety and obsession about how much talent they have and getting an agent is just how it typically manifests.

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