Writing Contest Winners!

 

Alright, folks. We have our 3 writing contest winners!

 

First, here’s a recap on the prizes and judges:

 

Prizes:

1st place:

  • $150 USD cash prize
  • 100,000 word basic editing, which includes line edits and some copy edits, sponsored by Shalamar (valued at $550)
  • 1 custom book cover design, sponsored by Infinity Flower Publishing (valued at $75)
  • 8,000 word developmental edit, sponsored by TR Perri Literary Editing (valued at $250)
  • 25,000 word critique, sponsored by Owl Editing (valued at $125)
  • 30-day tweet book advertising campaign, sponsored by Tweet Your Books (valued at $59)
  • One-year free membership to A Writer’s Path Writers Club, sponsored by A Writer’s Path Writers Club (valued at $8.95)
  • Publication in our future writing contest winners anthology

 

2nd place:

  • $50 USD cash prize
  • 100,000 word basic editing, which includes line edits and some copy edits, sponsored by Shalamar (valued at $550)
  • 1 custom book cover design, sponsored by Infinity Flower Publishing (valued at $75)
  • 8,000 word developmental edit, sponsored by TR Perri Literary Editing (valued at $250)
  • 25,000 word critique, sponsored by Owl Editing (valued at $125)
  • 30-day tweet book advertising campaign, sponsored by Tweet Your Books (valued at $59)
  • One-year free membership to A Writer’s Path Writers Club, sponsored by A Writer’s Path Writers Club (valued at $8.95)
  • Publication in our future writing contest winners anthology

 

3rd place:

  • $50 USD cash prize
  • 100,000 word basic editing, which includes line edits and some copy edits, sponsored by Shalamar (valued at $550)
  • 1 custom book cover design, sponsored by Infinity Flower Publishing (valued at $75)
  • 8,000 word developmental edit, sponsored by TR Perri Literary Editing (valued at $250)
  • 25,000 word critique, sponsored by Owl Editing (valued at $125)
  • 30-day tweet book advertising campaign, sponsored by Tweet Your Books (valued at $59)
  • One-year free membership to A Writer’s Path Writers Club, sponsored by A Writer’s Path Writers Club (valued at $8.95)
  • Publication in our future writing contest winners anthology

 

 

About our judges:

Andrea Lundgren: Andrea has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Writing and a Bachelor of Science in Drama, Television, and Film. As a book and blurb writing coach, she works with authors from all over the world. She has studied the art of fiction writing from an academic and professional reader’s point-of-view for over a decade, and she specializes in a broad spectrum of genres.

 –Allison Maruska: Allison is the author of the best-selling novel The Fourth Descendant and its standalone sequel, The Seventh Seed. She enjoys reading and writing mystery, suspense, and YA fiction primarily. In addition to writing, Allison is a wife, mother, and a certified reading interventionist at a high-risk elementary school in her area.

Paige Barrera: Paige is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a degree in Agricultural Communication and Journalism. When she’s not writing fantasy and love stories, she enjoys assisting authors as an editor, typesetter, and book cover designer. She lives in Houston, Texas with her husband and eleven pets.

 –Deborah Dixon: Deborah is an author and publisher. She is a cofounder of Shalamar, an author services and advocacy company. Her second novel, Connected, Inc, will be released this year.

 –Silvia Curry: Silvia’s Reading Corner opened over five years ago out of her love of books and her passion to make books better. Specializing in fiction, she reads and works on a wide array of novels from sci-fi to gritty romance to gruesome horror and everything in-between.

 

Here are the winners:

1st place: Claude Eliska

2nd place: Chang Lee Ann

3rd place: Cynthia Hilston

 

I want to thank all the judges, sponsors, and participants of this writing contest. It was a lot of fun, and we heard from some talented authors.

 

We’ll close this out with a sample of the story that won first place:


 

Night Walk

(sample)

 

The lights surrounding the Hallman Industries factory kept it illuminated like a beacon. With a light fixture positioned every fifty feet around the structure, which boasted sixty thousand lumens of output combined, these lights formed a 150-foot ring of safety all the way around the factory. A ring of safety Mitra had hoped he would never actually need to rely on.

Today, however, calamity befell Mitra as he neared the end of his shift at work. A misaligned rotor caused the belt on his production line to tear, taking it offline. The process of fixing it and making up for lost time to meet his daily production quota had taken two hours.
Now it was 6:30 p.m. and the sun was setting. It took with it the safety of its ninety thousand lumens per square foot of blanketing light. As Mitra stared at the growing darkness beyond the safety of the factory lamps, all he felt was despair.

The electrical hum of lights spinning up was welcome; so familiar a sound now that the dark, by comparison, was terrifying. He looked up with hope and saw its source. A path of light fixtures before him, leading away from the factory. Looking more carefully, he was certain this path led to the worker dormitories. To Mitra, each light looked like an angel descended from heaven, promising to guide him to safety. Each one another fifty thousand lumens of defiance against the devouring darkness.

Mitra hurried towards the path of lights, anxious to get back to the safety provided by being indoors. Rumors remained that being outside after dark was dangerous, even with a light. He didn’t want to test the truth of it. As he approached, he began to see a problem with the path of lights. Each individual lamp lit up a sizable area, but together, they didn’t provide a solid path of light. Between each circle of safe, protecting aura was a dark region, probably about five feet across.

The first dark region was at the edge of the factory lighting. Mitra stared at it in apprehension. Was it really only five feet across? It seemed more like five miles. With a sigh, he reached into his bag. After a few moments of searching, he pulled out a small lamp he always carried for emergencies. Its output was a measly five thousand lumens. It couldn’t compete with the output of the floodlights above him, but maybe it’d be enough to get him across five feet.

Mitra stepped toward the first dark region, his lamp held high above him, its glow hardly even noticeable amidst the lighting from overhead. He shuffled as close to the darkness as he dared before he faltered. Mitra sensed the eyes watching him. He knew where they were coming from. They were coming from the darkness, just beyond the reach of his sight. The devious things in the darkness, they were out for him tonight. Mitra felt compelled to ease back a few steps into the safety of the light from the factory.

Why would the designers leave gaps in the light here? Didn’t they know that even small gaps in between were dangerous? Mitra cursed. The designers must be ridiculously cruel, or ridiculously stupid, to have set up the lights like this.

Mitra studied the distance to the first circle of light. He held his breath and closed his eyes. Then, he sprinted, screaming into the barrier of darkness, his small lamp held high above him. He could tell when he crossed into the darkness, even through his closed eyelids. His eyes also immediately told him when he returned to the safety of the light.

Mitra stopped and opened his eyes. After a moment spent looking around, he jumped for joy. He had made it. It was a small milestone, reaching the first light post, but it was proof—proof he could do this. He would simply sprint from light to light all the way home. Mitra’s trusty handheld lamp was enough to fend back the monstrosities lurking in the darkness.

Mitra felt his confidence building as he approached the next gap in the light. With the lamp still held above him, he bolted through it, this time with his eyes open. He emerged from the darkness to the next spot of light. A wide smile formed on his face. He could do this.

 (end of sample)


 

 

 

 

 

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9 thoughts on “Writing Contest Winners!”

  1. Congratulations guys!!!

    Out of curiosity, how often will these contests be held? I didn’t find out about this one until it was far too close to the deadline but would love to throw my hat in the ring in the future.

    Liked by 1 person

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