How People Judge a Book By Its Cover


by Richard Risemberg


If your work is to be produced by a trade publisher, the cover will be entirely out of your hands. This can be a good thing, and it can be a bad thing: good, because it is by no means easy to design and produce a good cover; bad, because you may get stuck with a bad one. In A Moveable Feast, Ernest Hemingway notes how he felt that the original cover to Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby was awful, looking like something designed for a cheap sci-fi potboiler–and later mentions Scott’s complaints that the book wasn’t selling well. Fitzgerald was a popular and successful author at the time.

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How to Write Children’s Picture Books: Enrich Your Story With Dialogue


by Yvonne Blackwood


Your Ronnie Rabbit story is progressing nicely and you are loving his intricate moves. Then halfway into the tale, it dawns on you that the story cannot be all narration. There must be interactions between Ronnie and other animals—family members, friends, even enemies. The missing link is dialogue. Your anthropomorphic rabbit, behaving like a human being, must speak to someone at sometime in order to make some scenes come alive.

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Real Writers Persist. Always.


by Lauren Sapala


When writers first start out writing they tend to concentrate on all the wrong things. The big question always seems to be: Do I have talent? This is followed closely by: How do I get an agent? When I was a new writer I also agonized quite a bit over these things. It’s very normal. Whenever a person begins to truly take risks and follow their passion, the first challenges to surface are always questions of self worth and approval from others.

And make no mistake, that IS what the talent and agent questions are really all about: self worth and approval. Every human being goes through it in one form or another. For writers, anxiety and obsession about how much talent they have and getting an agent is just how it typically manifests.

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How to Avoid Info-Dumps in Your Stories


by Ryan Lanz


Dumping is rarely appreciated anywhere, and inside your novel is no different.

When I started writing, I can remember feeling the urge to clue the reader in on every tidbit of information on a character/setting, including the culture, people, landscape, type of plants that grow there, every holiday, flavors of tea consumed, what type of bear is best (a Jim Halpert reference), etc.

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Should You Make That Comment or Not?


[Note from Ryan: While this post isn’t directly about writing much, I think much of what is discussed can be applied to writing. For example, book reviews for other authors and interacting with readers. I enjoyed Stephanie’s article and I think you all will to. Enjoy!]

by Stephanie O’Brien


I recently had an interesting experience on DeviantArt, and it reminded me of an important principle that applies to both your creative career and your life in general.

I was reading one of Zarla’s “Momplates” comics, and I thought about making a comment. I typed something I thought was fitting and funny… and then paused.

I found myself asking, Should I post this? Does it add enough to the conversation, or is it just more internet noise? She already gets a lot of comments on her art.

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New AWP Services Available!


Hi all!

A Writer’s Path now offers author-related services. As an author, I know how it can be a pain to sort through dozens of service providers just to have your book ready for publication.

Although these services have to do with both indie and traditionally published authors, indie authors have much more to do on their own and rely on service providers heavily.

In an effort to branch out and make AWP a “one-stop-shop,” I’ve gathered together a group of highly skilled service providers from a range of services, all ready to serve this readership.

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This is a Writer’s Worst Enemy


by Sarah Pesce


I don’t know about you, but if given two months to write something, whether it’s 2 pages or 20 pages, I wouldn’t be starting immediately. Nope, you’d find me procrastinating on the writing up until the last day or two, then scrambling to get it done. After a bit of panic, I’d finally go into total focus mode and bang it out just under the wire.

Why, why, why did I do this to myself?

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Do You Think Technology is Good for Writers?


by Jean M. Cogdell


Where would you be as a writer without your computer?

Just think about it for a minute. We have come to rely on little electronic robots in every stage of our lives from the grocery store to the gas pumps. So of course, we come to rely on technology to enable us to write faster and better stories.

One of my favorite bloggers Ryan Lanz posted an article about robots taking over the world of writers.

The thought made my imagination whirl like a carnival ride.

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4 Methods For Creating Character Names


by Ryan Lanz


A common question I hear tossed about is how to create character names. Some writers find this simple, and yet others struggle with naming every single one, particularly concerning the main cast.

In this post, we’ll talk about tricks and tips for creating character names, and perhaps we’ll bring some ease to the process.

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