Where Writers Get Stuck: Drafting

 

by Allison Maruska

 

Welcome to Part 2 of our blog mini-series on where writers get stuck, based on this poll I took on Twitter.

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From Writer to Editor: Two Tips for Better Self-Editing

 

by Liam Cross

 

Writing and editing, whilst they might be of similar nature, are two totally different beasts, and it’s a lot to do with the thought processes behind them that causes the web to be woven like this. It’s often thought that a great book isn’t written, but is rather rewritten – and that’s because it’s the truth.

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Make Your Readers Cry: Writing Emotional Scenes

 

by Allison Maruska

 

I watched The Hunger Games last night. I read the book before the movie came out, and I’ve seen the movie a few times. So I obviously knew what would happen. Still, a certain scene got me.

By that, I mean it made me weepy.

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The Plight of Grammar in Writing

 

by Doug Lewars

 

“have it your talking may about you Good can’t what to to reader overrated you’re some idea grammar if ignored. when be but be want writing it entirely comes”

The above is a random collection of words – literally random – I used a random number generator in Excel to produce them; however, before being randomized they were once a coherent sentence. The original sentence was ‘Good grammar may be overrated when it comes to writing but it can’t be entirely ignored if you want your reader to have some idea what you’re talking about.’

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Should You Write Third Person Omniscient?

 

by Andrea Lundgren

 

So yesterday, having written about the benefits of omniscient narration, I thought I’d rewrite a scene from third person close narration, using an omniscient narrator. I figured out the narrator’s identity, his perspective on the characters, and how he came to know the details of the story, and I sat down to see how such a perspective would work.

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3 Tips For Being an Effective Writer

 

by R.J.Harrigan

 

Being a writer is one of the hardest but most rewarding passions to pursue. Unless you’re thinking monetary rewards in which case, be a doctor or something. I kid…not really.

How to be a writer is another challenge. Here are 3 simple tips to follow so you can call yourself a writer too!

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What to Do After the First Draft

 

by Katie McCoach

 

Your fingers hurt. Your eyes burn. You haven’t had anything to drink except coffee for the past few days, weeks, year. You are pretty sure you haven’t slept a full night without dreaming about characters and plot lines.

You are certain you will never type again. Because you finally finished writing the first draft of your novel. Phew!

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Why Writing an “Easy Read” is Actually Hard to Do

 

by Helena Fairfax

 

I’ve become used to people’s reactions these days when I say I write romance. People who have never read a romance novel either ask me if I’ve ever thought of writing a “proper book,” or else they give me a funny sort of leer, as though I’m some sort of soft-porn peddler. Romance novels are held by many to be a pretty low form of the written word. Another cliché is that they follow a “formula,” and that anyone could just scribble a romance if they put their minds to it.

Continue reading Why Writing an “Easy Read” is Actually Hard to Do

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