How to Keep Married Fictional Couples Interesting Without Splitting Them Up

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by Stephanie O’Brien

You’ve just spent an entire novel bringing an amazing couple together.

They’re passionate, fun and fascinating to watch, and their chemistry has fans raving about how wonderful they are.

They’re so great that you’ve decided to write a sequel starring them… but there’s just one challenge.

You went and let them get married.

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Aided by Apps, Audiobooks Market Grows in Japan

by The Japan Times

The use of audiobooks is increasing steadily in Japan, providing a boon to the publishing industry, which is facing declining sales of ordinary books.

Audiobooks already account for 10 percent of book sales in the United States and Europe. In the U.S., audiobooks, which started as cassette tapes to listen to while driving, currently form a market worth ¥160 billion.

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Do You Judge Writers?

 

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by Christopher Slater

Whenever a person reads what someone else has written, there is always an expected level of judgment. The reader is going to judge whether the topic of the writing is something that they are interested in. They will judge the writer’s ability to express themselves or to describe a situation, act, person, or object. The reader will ultimately judge whether the writer’s work brought them any satisfaction.

All of this is expected and probably required if writing is to have any meaning. However, do you ever judge the writer as a person based on the content or style of their writing?

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On Writing With a Purpose

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by Meg Dowell

You likely learned in school that writing an essay begins with defining your target audience and purpose for reaching out to them. We all wrote that essay about whether or not our school should or shouldn’t have uniforms (did schools who already had uniforms still argue this?). Audience: school board. Purpose: convince the authority figures that we should or should not all dress alike.

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Bargain Book of the Week – The Love I Want to Be In

All Romance Reads

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This series highlights inexpensive, free, or discounted books to give you, dear reader, the most options on what to read.

The Love I Want to Be In

Free, reduced from $0.99

A new series from the author of Bluestone Homecoming and Waltz Back to Texas, the story of two sisters and their best friend finding their happily-ever-afters on the Texas coast.

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Self-Publishing: Five Time-Saving Tools

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by Hope Ann

A writer’s life is filled with so much more than the mere creating of stories. There is editing and proofreading. Marketing and newsletters. Blogging and graphics. We can take any help offered, and here are five free tools which have helped me save time and work the best I can.

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Should You Write a Fancy Outline for Your Novel?

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by Jean M. Cogdell

Maybe- Maybe not.

It’s your book, you make the rules.

Different strokes for different folks. Me, I’m trying to be more organized in my writing this year. Only time will tell if I’m successful. LOL

However, I find outlining is a bit of a mystery.

Outlining an unwritten book is weird because you don’t know what will happen. It’s not the same as outlining a book read for a class assignment. No the formal process of outlining a book idea is as foreign to me as Spanish or French. I know just enough to embarrass myself.

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The Homecoming – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

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The Homecoming by Stacie Ramey

It’s been a year since John lost his girlfriend, Leah, to suicide. Living with his uncle keeps his mind from the tragedy and his screwed up family—until he gets into trouble and a judge sends him back home. With a neglectful mother and abusive brother, John’s homecoming is far from happy.

As he tries to navigate and repair the relationships he abandoned years ago, Emily, the girl next door, is the only bright spot. She’s sweet and smart and makes him think his heart may finally be healing. But tragedy isn’t far away, and John must soon face an impossible decision: save his family or save himself.

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