Using Your Bad Ideas

 

by Chloe-Anne Ross

Other than uploading on time (sorry!) my biggest problem continues to be planning my novels. I plan on writing a series and right now I only have act 1 of W.OT.G worked out but even still I plan on re-working my plan.

My idea for the opening scene didn’t go so well and I knew I had to change the landscape she was climbing, the beasts she was running from and the compass she carried with her and just her entire word! No biggie : -/  hmm…right?

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Throwback Thursday: Things I Wish I Knew Before Self-Publishing

 

Throwback Thursday is a series where we take a look back at some of AWP’s most popular posts. Enjoy!

by J.U. Scribe

 

It’s been over a year since I published my book, Before the Legend. This past year I’ve learned so much about self-publishing and marketing. Although I’m thankful for the little successes and milestones I was able to reach, there were several things I wish I could have done differently before and after self-publishing my book. The first three in the list are things I already knew before publishing but underestimated while doing this process. Here are my top 7 things you want to do before you self-publish.

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Editorial Review – The Sons of Hernan Garcia

The Book Review Directory

Title: The Sons of Hernán García

Author: Charles Ameringer

Genre: Action/Adventure

The Sons of Hernán García, by Charles Ameringer, isclassified as an Action/Adventure. However, it also reads as historical fiction. More specifically, it is a revenge-tale set in early 20th century Venezuela. The history aspect reads well, probably because Ameringer is an actual professor of Latin History, so he knows the facts of that time and place, and is able to translate it well through this story.

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How to Write Children’s Picture Books: Is He a Good Guy or a Bad Guy?  (Part 5)

 

by Yvonne Blackwood

The creative juices are flowing and you are writing as if there is no tomorrow. You are able to do this because you have carefully plotted out your story. Great start. As the story progresses, Ronnie Rabbit gets up to some tricks. You have narrated these tricks and you know how the matter will be resolved in the end. Yet, somehow your rabbit character seems flat. Why is this?

Continue reading How to Write Children’s Picture Books: Is He a Good Guy or a Bad Guy?  (Part 5)

Using Mythology to Improve Your Writing

 

by Doug Lewars

Mythology is a goldmine for authors–particularly those who write fantasy–although some of the plots within the myths can be adapted to other genres as well. Myths are a feature of every culture and they’re generally used to explain natural phenomena or the establishment of cultural norms. They are deemed to be of sufficient importance that courses on the subject are offered at the university level.

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The Healer’s Secret – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

The newly released Healer’s Secret by Helen Pryke is a beautifully disturbing story.

Not a cozy read, it deals with controversial topics like alcoholism, domestic violence and decisions that can turn the fate of a whole family. Strung out over several generations of women who pass their healer’s knowledge on from mother to daughter, the tale draws the reader into their troubles and heartaches.

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How Every Writer Has Their Own Method

 

by Cynthia Hilston

 

How many of you remember the dreaded research papers you had to write in high school?  Raise your hand.  Better off, don’t raise your hand.  That’s too reminiscent of being back in school.  But anyway, I’ll tell you this: if I never have to write another research paper in my life, I won’t complain.

What I hated the most about the process was how formal and rigid it was.  When I was in school, the Internet was still pretty new, so we, the unfortunate victims, spent hours in libraries using dusty reference books that served better as paper weights and taking notes from pages with tiny print.  We had to write on 3×5 notecards in pencil.  We needed to come up with an outline, and this was to be done the proper way with the numbers, letters, Roman numerals, and I don’t even know what.  The rough draft was written in pencil, and yes, written by hand.  The final draft was then typed up.  I used my mom’s electric typewriter, as we didn’t have a computer with that now-antique Windows 95 on it. Continue reading How Every Writer Has Their Own Method

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