Book Quote Corner #58

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Where Are You on The Writing Growth Curve?

 

by Allison Maruska

My son has always been above average on the growth curve. Now, having just turned twelve, he’s caught up to his grandmother. He’s tall. And she’s . . . less than tall…The boy is tall, and the mom is short.

And yet, they’re the same height.

The observations are accurate because the boy is still growing. For his age, he is tall. And he’ll continue along the growth curve, leveling out somewhat, until he reaches his full height. His doctor thinks that will be around 6’1″.

How does this apply to writing? I’m so glad you asked!

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Yesterday’s Tomorrow – Book Review

The Book Review Directory


Yesterday’s Tomorrow (Tomorrow’s War Book 1) by G.W. Pomichter and William DuPree

Ah, alternate history recipes! What can’t you do? From Nazis with spaceships to Ben Franklin summoning dragons, alternate history meals can present all sorts of bizarre scenarios … and quite a few starkly realistic ones.

That is the intent of today’s meal, to show an alternate contemporary environment, diverging only a short time before the present day and trying to stay fiercely grounded in the real and natural. Does Yesterday’s Tomorrow capture the essence of realism and push forward this alternate history?

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How to Characterize Love in Your Writing

 

by Jacqui Murray

How do we characterize love in your writing?

Because, if you’re a writer, you must. It doesn’t have to be sex but it has to take readers that direction, right to the edge of the cliff. Yes, you can leave the lurid details out, but let readers peek over the edge.

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This is Why You’re Stuck in a Rut (Writing Wise)

 

by Meg Dowell

You’ve been sitting here for half an hour, trying to force yourself to write. You haven’t felt like doing it much, lately. So much so that you’re starting to question whether writing is something you even want to keep doing. Is it worth it? Are you even good enough at it to make it to the next level?

Everyone falls into ruts. It’s often confused with this term you might recognize: ‘writer’s block.’ (For the record, if you don’t already know this – I do not believe writer’s block exists, and will meet every argument you throw at me with evidence that you are wrong … roar.) In these places, you suffer from extreme boredom, doubt and a lack of motivation.

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My 4 Rules for Writing a Book Series

 

by Chloe-Anne Ross

So I’m about to start writing a trilogy, something I’ve never done before. I’ve got everything I need for a good story: characters I want to follow and a story I want to follow through with. I’m thrilled to be writing it and also scared as all hell.

It is lucky for anyone who is, has or wants to do the same thing that there is a multitude of series out there. It is by reading them that I’ve discovered what to avoid and what I have to remember when getting those words down. So here they are!

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All the Ugly and Wonderful Things – Book Review

All Romance Reads

All the Ugly and Wonderful Things by Brynn Greenwood

My Rating : 4.5 stars

Page count : 352 pages
Expected publication: August 9th 2016 by Thomas Dunne Books
Genre :Adult fiction, romance, contemporary.

My review:

This is the kind of book not everyone would enjoy reading. But if you want to take a chance, go in blind! Don’t read the blurb, don’t check out the back of the cover and definitely don’t read reviews, except for the next line.

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What Writing Taught Me About Exercise

 

by Kate Colby

Believe it or not, I used to be a “sporty” kid. Now, I’m not saying that I had great athletic talent (far from it), but I played basketball for seven years, tried cheerleading and volleyball for two, and rode horses competitively (and for leisure) until I went to university. However, somewhere along the way I lost touch with physical activity.

“Somewhere” means age 14 to 15. It started in freshman volleyball, when my coach played favorites (I was not one) and made the rest of the team miserable. Couple that with breaking my arm while horseback riding the following summer, and I was ready to give up sports. I went from a casual athlete to a proud, non-exercising emo kid (but that’s another story).

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