How Putting Together a Picture Book is Like Managing a Baseball Team

Baseball

 

by John Briggs

When I was a kid, I was passionate about two things: baseball and reading. There were summers where I barely missed a Phillies game on the radio. I either watched or listened to the All-Star game, the World Series, the playoffs, and was not above catching the odd spring training game or two. I even scoured the paper the next day to check out the box score… of a game I’d already listened to!

I also loved reading. While I was known to play baseball for as many as four hours a day, I also, and quite often, put in as many hours reading. And although I eventually moved on to middle-grade books, young adult, and tons of non-fiction, once upon a time it was all picture books.

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Finishing a Book is a Skill

Finish

 

by Millie Ho

It hit me recently that out of all the writing skills I have, actually finishing a book is my least developed.

Compared to other skills such as character development, world building, or plotting, which I improved on a lot in 2015, it’s very rare for me to finish a final draft of a book. This means a solid Chapter One that continued to The End. This is understandable given my problems with writing perfectionism, but now that I’m no longer ripping up every draft when something doesn’t work because I’m approaching the writing process differently, I’m still noticing something in the way.

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The Muse – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

The Muse

I received The Muse in exchange for an honest review

It’s inevitable that Jessie Burton’s new novel, The Muse, will be compared wth her smash-hit debut, The Miniaturist. And I seem to be in the minority in thinking that this novel is better than her first. It’s certainly cemented Jessie Burton as my my current favourite historical fiction writer. The Muse effortlessly brings to life other eras, cultures and life-like, three-dimensional characters, all wrapped in up luscious descriptions and a gripping plot which had me completely hooked. Not to mention, another stunner of a cover too.

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How to Write an Irresistible Love Triangle

Love

 

by Whitney Carter

Ah, the love triangle. For the romantically inclined, is there anything more enticing, more gut-wrenching? The passion, the torn desires, the often vastly different futures – it’s simply too much! *back of hand to forehead in fainting gesture!*

Okay, I’ll stop. But in all seriousness, a well-written triangle can have your readers not only emotionally invested in the characters and their struggles, but also in you as the writer. After all, love triangles are so easy to mess up that nine times out of ten, we as readers expect to be disappointed when the possibility of a triangle is presented. But a writer who can pull one off to our satisfaction? Gold.

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Why Comparing Yourself to Other Writers Doesn’t Make Sense

Apples and Oranges

 

by Meg Dowell

I have a favorite author. John Green is the kind of writer I would love to be. He is clever and cultured and knows his young adult audience so well you sometimes forget he’s almost 40 (sorry, John).

I admire him on a deep, creative level, as I’m sure many writers do. But that’s sort of where it ends. A long time ago, I’m sure I compared myself to other writers all the time. “I wish I could write like …” or, “I can’t believe she has so many fans.” I think we all do that, for a little while. But as a writer, at some point you realize how pointless this is. Trying to stand up and measure yourself against another writer just doesn’t make sense.

Why is comparing yourself to other writers such a waste of time?


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How to Make a Living as a Writer

How to Make a Living as a Writer

 

by Gary Smailes

So you want to make a living as a writer? Well despite what some writers will have you believe traditional publishing still offers writers a realistic chance of making a living as a writer. However, it’s not easy and it takes some planning, but it can be done. So here’s how to make a living as a writer…

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#Jerk – Book Review

All Romance Reads

#Jerk

#Jerk by Kat T. Masen on January 1st 1970

He was that boy in the playground. The one that pulled your pigtails. The one that lifted your dress in front of the entire school. Now he’s that guy in the office. The one that steals your lunch from the fridge. The one that gets away with everything. I’m sure you know him. Everyone knows that guy. He’s a #JERK.

Presley Malone knew her relationship with her fiancé, Jason, had run its course. The second that ring came off her finger, she didn’t expect to be the pawn in an immature game played by the office jerk. His name is Haden Cooper, and he is six years younger than her. Immature and irresponsible, getting drunk and stoned every weekend like he never left college. He rode a motorcycle, carrying a different girl each week. He was everything a jerk should be—insensitive…

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Biggest Writing Pet Peeves

cat-1378184_640

 

by J.U. Scribe

Pet peeves.

We all have them. That one thing that gets under our skin and ticks us off. It can be any number of things depending on the person you ask. For some people it can range from bad body odor,  unreliability, slow drivers, fake people, tardiness, just to name a few. When it comes to writing though, most of you reading this have at least one pet peeve in regards to books you’ve read.

If you were to ask a group of people what their pet peeves are, I’m sure the responses would vary. Many of them though can be boiled down to three main complaints. This is by no means an exhaustive list but here are some of the top ones I’ve heard many lament about.

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The Difference Between What Women and Men Read

Restroom

 

by Ariel Kusby

When it comes to the difference between the reading habits of women and men, study after study has shown that females generally tend to complete more books per year, regardless of genre. While there is no definitive answer as to why this is true, female readership has undoubtedly increased over the past century.

Though women read more in general, they also tend to read more of certain genres and less of others. A 2007 NPR article reported that women account for eighty percent of the fiction market. Men, in contrast, have been reported to read more nonfiction, the most popular topics being history, politics, and business. Men are also more likely to read science fiction.

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Glass Sword – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

Glass Sword

Glass Sword by Victoria Aveyard
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Published: 02/09/2016

Summary:  Mare Barrow’s blood is red—the color of common folk—but her Silver ability, the power to control lightning, has turned her into a weapon that the royal court tries to control. The crown calls her an impossibility, a fake, but as she makes her escape from Maven, the prince—the friend—who betrayed her, Mare uncovers something startling: she is not the only one of her kind.

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