7 Ways to Write Visually (Without Describing Everything)

Scenery

 

by Phoebe Quinn

The world is pretty visual, but I’m not. Despite my insistence that, if I had to choose, I’d rather lose my hearing than my sight, I’ve never been able to work in a visual way. My mother is an artist and Boyfriend is a filmmaker, and I admire the crap out of them for their talent even more so than I ordinarily would because they work in ways I just cannot understand.

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Not Second Best – Book Review

All Romance Reads

Not Second Best

Summary

As a lawyer at Touchstone management, Tessa’s position brings her up close and personal to some of the world’s biggest heartthrobs. Sometimes that intimacy crosses professional lines, which is understandable considering Tessa’s impressive contact list. But when rock star Brian Ellis set her aside for the girl of his dreams, Tessa can’t help wonder if “spinster aunt” is her true vocation. Which explains her hook-up with rising star Brett Cherney at Brian’s celebrity wedding . . .

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Why Are Rituals So Important For Writers and Artists?

Pencils

 

by Pekoeblaze

A few months ago, I read a fascinating online article about “method writing”, which also mentioned some of the things that famous writers did to get into the mood for writing. So, I thought that I’d share a few of my own thoughts about this subject.

To be honest, “method writing” sounds like a silly fad which, from the descriptions in the article, actually seems to get in the way of actually writing – rather than enhancing the experience. It’s probably a good type of publicity stunt, I guess. However, many writers and other creative people have some kind of ritual that they use to get into the mood.

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Do You Ever Feel Like You’re Writing the Same Thing Over and Over?

Bulb

 

by Meg Dowell

We are in a weird era of online publishing right now. The internet is a mix of personal essays meant to be empowering, listicles meant to be funny and news stories meant to be accurate. The more of these genres of content get tossed around, though, the less appeal they have. I’m pretty sure if I see another article about body positivity – as much as I support the movement and appreciate the idea behind it – I’m going to lose it.

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The City of Mirrors – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

The City of Mirrors

When the latest and final installment of one of my favorite series came out last week, I raced over to the bookstore to pluck it off the shelf (along with several other books that I just couldn’t help but grab as well). Arms overloaded with books, I made my way into my house where I unceremoniously plopped them down on my bed and cracked open The City of Mirrors, by Justin Cronin.

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Why Networking is So Important For Aspiring Authors

Handshake

 

by Monique Hall

Up until recently, I was writing in the closet. By choice, the only person I had to speak to about my writing was my husband. Luckily, he’s interested and very supportive of everything I do, but as I recently finished the first draft of my very first manuscript, I knew it was time to start seeking feedback elsewhere.

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Why We Still Go to Bookstores in The Age of Amazon

Bookstore

 

by Ariel Kusby

When the Kindle was released eight years ago, news outlets prophesized that by 2016, eBook sales would overtake print, and bookstores would become obsolete. Online book sales had increased dramatically, and because of the recent release of eBook reading devices, publishing companies assumed that the Internet would soon eradicate physical spaces where book buyers go to find new reading material. In 2016, eBooks are indeed popular, but many people still patronize physical bookstores.

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Crystallum – Book Review

All Romance Reads

Crystallum

Release date: 26th October 2016
Publisher: Jagged Lane Books
Source: Netgalley
Rating: 4/5

Synopsis

Kadence Sparrow wasn’t born a devil’s child-she was turned into one. Now, she’s hiding from the truth, and running for her life.

For years, Kade’s true nature has lurked behind an illusion, so when her dad gets another job transfer, she knows the drill: no close friends, no boyfriends, and most importantly: don’t expose what she is. Ever. Keeping secrets is easy. Lies are second nature. So is the loneliness and the fear, but when the Shadows attack and Kade meets Cole Spires, she could expose everything she’s trying to hide.

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Self-Publishing or Traditional: Which One is Right for You?

Question mark

 

by Katie McCoach

For those who are planning to self-publish a book, you may have heard by now that self-publishing is a business. It’s your business, and treating your business with professionalism and enlisting in the required help will help your business (books) succeed.

For those seeking agent representation, this idea also holds true, however a publisher is in charge of many of the business decisions instead of you.

How do you decide which option is best for you?

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A New Era of Pulp Fiction?

Biker

 

By Larry Kahaner

I have been waiting for an announcement like James Patterson’s “Book Shots” to cement my ongoing belief that the modern age of pulp fiction is upon us.

Patterson’s new book machine is producing novels “under 150 pages for under $5.” It promises: “Life moves fast–books should too… Impossible to put down. Read on any device.” The website also touts: “All Thriller. No Filler.”

Swell, baby.

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