#Jerk – Book Review

All Romance Reads

#Jerk

#Jerk by Kat T. Masen on January 1st 1970

He was that boy in the playground. The one that pulled your pigtails. The one that lifted your dress in front of the entire school. Now he’s that guy in the office. The one that steals your lunch from the fridge. The one that gets away with everything. I’m sure you know him. Everyone knows that guy. He’s a #JERK.

Presley Malone knew her relationship with her fiancé, Jason, had run its course. The second that ring came off her finger, she didn’t expect to be the pawn in an immature game played by the office jerk. His name is Haden Cooper, and he is six years younger than her. Immature and irresponsible, getting drunk and stoned every weekend like he never left college. He rode a motorcycle, carrying a different girl each week. He was everything a jerk should be—insensitive…

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Biggest Writing Pet Peeves

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by J.U. Scribe

Pet peeves.

We all have them. That one thing that gets under our skin and ticks us off. It can be any number of things depending on the person you ask. For some people it can range from bad body odor,  unreliability, slow drivers, fake people, tardiness, just to name a few. When it comes to writing though, most of you reading this have at least one pet peeve in regards to books you’ve read.

If you were to ask a group of people what their pet peeves are, I’m sure the responses would vary. Many of them though can be boiled down to three main complaints. This is by no means an exhaustive list but here are some of the top ones I’ve heard many lament about.

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The Difference Between What Women and Men Read

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by Ariel Kusby

When it comes to the difference between the reading habits of women and men, study after study has shown that females generally tend to complete more books per year, regardless of genre. While there is no definitive answer as to why this is true, female readership has undoubtedly increased over the past century.

Though women read more in general, they also tend to read more of certain genres and less of others. A 2007 NPR article reported that women account for eighty percent of the fiction market. Men, in contrast, have been reported to read more nonfiction, the most popular topics being history, politics, and business. Men are also more likely to read science fiction.

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Glass Sword – Book Review

The Book Review Directory

Glass Sword

Glass Sword by Victoria Aveyard
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Published: 02/09/2016

Summary:  Mare Barrow’s blood is red—the color of common folk—but her Silver ability, the power to control lightning, has turned her into a weapon that the royal court tries to control. The crown calls her an impossibility, a fake, but as she makes her escape from Maven, the prince—the friend—who betrayed her, Mare uncovers something startling: she is not the only one of her kind.

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Classic Writing Advice: Write Every Day

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by Kate M. Colby

In this new series, I want to explore some of the classic writing advice given to authors and provide my opinions on any experiences with them. I don’t do this because I think I’m some brilliant writing authority – far from it. Rather, I’ve learned the most valuable writing lesson of all, one that you’ve probably heard, but that takes a long time to sink in:

There is no magic secret to writing. You just do it, and every writer does it differently.

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Respect the Reviewer: How to Find, Contact, and Stay on the Good Side of Book Reviewers

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by thehappymeerkat

Here’s the second Respect the Reviewer article I’ve written (the first can be read here).  This is for all authors out there.  While some tips might be obvious others you may not have thought of, either way I hope some of these tips will help you find a reviewer and go about contacting them the right way. :)

All authors know the importance of getting book reviews. Not only can a good book review encourage others to buy your book but if you get enough of them your book will be listed higher on amazon (or so the rumour goes). But how can authors go about contacting reviewers? And what’s the right or wrong thing to say and do when asking and waiting for a review?

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10 Things My Blog Taught Me

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by Jacqui Murray

When I started this blog three years and 586 posts ago, I wasn’t sure where to take it. I knew I wanted to connect with other writers so I used that as the theme. Now, thanks to the 430,000+ people who have visited, I know much more about the ‘why’. Yes, it’s about getting to know kindred souls, but there is so much more I’ve gotten from blogging. Like these:

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November 9 – Book Review

All Romance Reads

November 9

TITLE: November 9

AUTHOR: Colleen Hoover

GENRE: New Adult Fiction, Contemporary, Romance

DATE PUBLISHED: November 10, 2015 by Atria Books

DATE FINISHED: November 30, 2015

RATING: 3/5

SUMMARY: Fallon meets Ben, an aspiring novelist, the day before her scheduled cross-country move. Their untimely attraction leads them to spend Fallon’s last day in L.A. together, and her eventful life becomes the creative inspiration Ben has always sought for his novel. Over time and amidst the various relationships and tribulations of their own separate lives, they continue to meet on the same date every year. Until one day Fallon becomes unsure if Ben has been telling her the truth or fabricating a perfect reality for the sake of the ultimate plot twist.

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Ratchet Up Your Novel’s Tension

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by Kelsie Engen

Did you know there is one super easy way to ratchet up the tension in your novel? It doesn’t take much work on your part, but it creates an immense amount of pressure for your characters. And we all know that pressure=tension=page turner.

So what is this one little trick? It’s nothing fancy, I assure you. But it’s something that many authors use and many forget about.

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Five Reasons I Stop Reading Your Blog Post

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by Allison Maruska

I read a lot of blog posts over the course of a week. A lot. And most of them don’t come from my WordPress Reader, where the blogs I’ve subscribed to are listed. I find most of them on Twitter blog share days, where bloggers can share their interesting content with specified hashtags, expanding potential readership.

We all know getting the potential reader to click the post is job one – we do this with an interesting title, pictures, and the text blurb. Job two is keeping them there. So for the love of all things holy, if you are a blogger, please don’t do things unrelated to your content that make me close your window. I want to read your interesting insights, and I’m sure I’m not alone. If I enjoy the content and there’s nothing there that hurts my brain, I’ll likely subscribe to your blog.

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